A Bit Like You And Me Radio

December 17, 2012

The Drifters - White Christmas (1954)

Created in 1953 by George Treadwell to be a backing group for Clyde McPhatter, this group has never had a consistent lineup. With over sixty people being in various incarnations of the group, they are regarded as one of the least stable groups in doo-wop and rhythm and blues/soul history. As an example of their different lineups, “Money Honey” was released in 1953 by the original Clyde McPhatter and The Drifters; “This Magic Moment” was released in 1960 by Ben E. King with The Drifters, a different incarnation; and “Under the Boardwalk” was released in 1964 by The Drifters featuring Johnny Moore (a previous singer from the group in 1958), also a different incarnation. Although the group has had more than twenty successful songs, it would be far too complex to accurately and clearly explain which members were in which incarnation of the group during the time of each of their many hits. Instead, we’ll just say that there’s a reason so many people wanted to be affiliated with The Drifters’ name: they were known for success.

This song, written and composed by Irving Berlin, was first recorded and released by Bing Crosby in the 1942 film, Holiday Inn. Crosby’s version has sold over fifty million copies and is the best-selling single of all time for any music category. This version of the song, recorded and released by a version of The Drifters that featured Bill Pinkney and Clyde McPhatter, was released in 1954 and topped out at the number two spot on the US R&B charts in December. On the US pop charts, it reached number eighty. In recent years, it has been most memorably associated with Macaulay Culkin’s character, Kevin McCallister, in the 1990 movie Home Alone.

album art

The Drifters - White Christmas (1954)

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Lyrics:

I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
Just like the ones I used to know
Where those treetop glisten and children listen
To hear sleigh bells in the snow
The snow

And I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
With every Christmas card I write
May your days, may your days, may your days be merry and bright
And may all your Christmases be white

I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
Just like the ones I used to know
Where the treetops glisten and the children listen
To hear sleigh bells in the snow

I’m dreaming of a white Christmas
With every Christmas card I write
May those days, may your days, may your days be merry and bright
And may all your Christmases be white

Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way

2 comments:

  1. I liked the first guy's mellow (baritone?) voice but not the guy with the high pitched voice. Spoilt a great song for me.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I tend to agree with you. I often press the skip button once that guy starts to sing. But you can still enjoy the first part of the song!

    ReplyDelete