A Bit Like You And Me Radio

December 10, 2012

Normie Rowe & The Playboys - Sad (1967)

Not to be confused with Gary Lewis & the Playboys, this Australian band is mostly remembered for their best-selling single “Que Sera Sera” / “Shakin’ All Over,” which was one of the best-selling Australian singles in the 1960s. Signing to the Sunshine label in 1964, the band was led by Normie Rowe, who would become one of Australia’s top entertainers in 1966 and ’67. Together, the group gained wide popularity in Australia and decided to try and tap into an international market. Nicknamed The (Australian) Playboys, they toured in England, Canada, and the United States. They performed at Expo ’67 in Montreal and were a part of a five week tour opening for Roy Orbison and Sam the Sham & The Pharaohs. They returned home in July 1967, but were forced into a quick “farewell tour” when Normie Rowe was drafted in September. With Rowe in basic training and eventually Vietnam, The Playboys evolved into the band Procession and this phase of the group was no more. Rowe survived Vietnam and continues to perform to this day.

This song was released on the 1967 single that featured “Black Sheep RIP” on the flip side, a reading of the poem “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep.” This song, released in August of ‘67, is now considered a freakbeat classic. The original single is highly sought after by collectors, despite it failing both critically and commercially upon its initial release. Written by Brian Peacock, the song has appeared on quite a few ‘60s music compilation collections.

album art

Normie Rowe & The Playboys - Sad (1967)

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Lyrics:

See Sad
Sitting with his head in his hands
See Sad
Pity no one understands

Look at the sad man (look at the sad man)
“Sad” is his name
Look at the sad man (look at the sad man)
He’s not to blame

Sad walkin’
With his shadow
Sad talkin’
There’s nobody there to hear
Nobody’s near

See Sad
Missing out on all of the fun
See Sad
Trouble is, he’s not the only one

Look at the sad man (look at the sad man)
He’s all alone
Look at the sad man (look at the sad man)
Nobody phones

Sad mending
Washing dishes
Pretending
There’s somebody there to hear
Nobody’s near

Look at the sad man (look at the sad man)
“Sad” is his name
Look at the sad man (look at the sad man)
He’s not to blame

See
See Sad

3 comments:

  1. In 1966/67, I used to listen avidly to Radio Caroline, an offshore "pirate" radio station broadcasting to the UK. Normie Rowe's "Ooh La La" and "Going Home" were on their play lists and I thought they were brilliant!

    Thanks to the Internet, YouTube and the people who upload music, I'm able to hear these again - and they're still great!

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    Replies
    1. We need more offshore pirate radio stations playing decent music. If it weren't for the Internet, could you imagine the things people wouldn't be able to enjoy? At least we have that. These guys are great!

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    2. "Caroline" by the Fortunes was used as the theme tune for Radio Caroline. Another great song from the 60s!

      The Fortunes 60s songs were my favourites although their 70s music, which I didn't like, seemed to be more popular.

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