A Bit Like You And Me Radio

October 27, 2011

The Fire - Father's Name Was Dad (1968)

Originally going by the name Fryday’s Child, this band was originally signed to Decca and later recorded under The BeatlesApple Records. Before they were able to put out their future concept album, The Magic Shoemaker, they were caught up in Apple’s politics. They secured the rights for their songs from Decca and Apple and went on to complete the album independently.

This song, sounding a lot like (the earlier) The Who, was their first single and initially released as a different version until Paul McCartney had it pulled off of the shelves because it “lacked punch.” The band re-recorded the song within days and released it again to everyone’s delight. If you listen closely, you’ll notice the opening of the song is borrowed from “Last Train to Clarksville” by The Monkees.

The Fire - Father's Name Was Dad

The Fire - Father's Name Was Dad (1968)

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Lyrics:

From a kid of four, you don’t expect
A supernatural intellect
You need just like the other kids
Live the world of building bricks

My father’s name was ‘dad’
My mother’s name was ‘mom’
How can I take the blame
For anything I’ve done?

So, now at my present age
Which people call the awkward stage
Why should everything be made
To look like insane escapade?

My father’s name was ‘dad’
My mother’s name was ‘mom’
How can I take the blame
For anything I’ve done?

See the horrors of my eyes
Make my career of empty skies
I laugh at it all

So, now at my present age
Which people call the awkward stage
Why should everything be made
To look like insane escapade?

My father’s name was ‘dad’
My mother’s name was ‘mom’
How can I take the blame
For anything I’ve done?

2 comments:

  1. The version of this song on the Freakbeat Scene collection is apparently the original "lacked punch", but I like it because sounds grittier.

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    1. I like that version as well. I think it sounds like it was recorded live at a local coffeehouse (though I doubt that it was meant to sound that way). All in all though, I think it did lack the punch McCartney was referring to. That version, to me, sounds like it would have fit in better during the '80s.

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