A Bit Like You And Me Radio

June 29, 2012

The Barber Green - Life (1968)

Formed in 1966 and named for an asphalt paving machine, this group was composed of high school students from Brownsville, Oregon. Located about a half hour north of Eugene, Oregon, the group gained enough local popularity to play all over their home state. Only able to have one recording session, they recorded two tracks they had rehearsed, followed by four “unreleased” tracks of improvised jamming. At one point, the group had a chance to do a USO tour of Vietnam during the Vietnam Conflict, but after the Tet Offensive, the tour was canceled. The group disbanded in 1970.

This song, written by their lead singer, David Lee Harding, was the B-side to the only release by the group. The A-Side, “Gliding Ride,” was a hit up and down the entire west coast, going as far as reaching number one on a few local stations in Oregon and California.

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The Barber Green - Life (1968)

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Lyrics:

When I was young
And full of life
My dad said to me, “Son
You better take a wife”

I looked around
For the girl dad told me of
Nowhere could I find my one
My only love

Then one day, I saw her face
It was a face without a name
But when she spoke on a cloudy day
The sun came out again

She told me of her search for love
And I told her of mine
I said to myself, “I got to have this girl”
“She’s nature’s own design”

We got married, had lots of kids
And lived where the folks were fine
Me and my wife and our four kids
In a struggle for all mankind

When I was young
And full of life
My dad said to me, “Son
You better take a wife”

When I was young
And full of life

And full of life

Life

June 28, 2012

Mark Wirtz & Tomorrow - Grocer Jack (Excerpt from A Teenage Opera) (1967)

In January 1966, Mark Wirtz had an idea for a rock opera album "A Teenage Opera". The opportunity to create the album presented itself when Wirtz was hired by EMI as a record producer in January 1967. The next month, Wirtz shared the idea of his rock opera with his famed engineer, Geoff Emerick, and they got to work. The completed grand idea, still in Wirtz’s mind, was an album in which each song was a story surrounding characters living in a village and a boy named Sam telling these stories to his female companion. (Sam would later inspire Pete Townshend’s Tommy). Eventually, Wirtz hoped, the album would be turned into an animated feature akin to The BeatlesYellow Submarine. Needing a band, he employed The In Crowd, who would soon change their names to Tomorrow.

The first song that was released from the budding album, heard below, was originally called “Excerpt from A Teenage Opera,” indicating to listeners that it was only the beginning of what was intended to be created. Released on July 28th, 1967, it received heavy air time throughout the Summer of Love, largely due to the pirate radio stations popping up on both sides of the Atlantic. Eventually, rumors began to circulate that the entire album had been finished in September and that a musical was already in the works. Sadly, in actuality, the next few singles released would do very poorly, and, mixed with Wirtz’s time being dedicated to producing Tomorrow, the album was put aside for nearly thirty years until its 1996 release.

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Mark Wirtz & Tomorrow - Grocer Jack (Excerpt from A Teenage Opera) (1967)

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Lyrics:

Cast the days into years
Yes, eighty-two brings many fears
Yesterday's laughter turned to tears
His arms and legs don't feel so strong
His heart is weak; there's something wrong
Opens windows in despair
Tries to breathe in some fresh air
His conscience cries, "Get on your feet
Without you, Jack, the town can't eat"

Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, get off your back
Go into town, don't let them down
Oh no, no
Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, get off your back
Go into town, don't let them down
Oh no, no

The people that live in the town
Don't understand; he's never been known to miss his round
“It's ten o'clock,” the housewives yell
"When Jack turns up, we'll give him hell"
Husbands moan at breakfast tables, no milk, no eggs, no marmalade labels
Mothers send their children out to Jack's house to scream and shout

(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, get off your back)
(Come into town, don't let us down)
(Oh no, no)
(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, get off your back)
(Come into town, don't let us down)
(Oh no, no)

It's Sunday morning, bright and clear
Lovely flowers decorate a marble square
People cry and walk away, think about the fateful day
Now they wish they'd given Jack more affection and respect
The little children, dressed in black, don't know what's happened to old Jack

(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, is it true what Mummy says?)
(You won't come back?)
(Oh no, no)

(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, is it true what Mummy says?)
(You won't come back?)
(Oh no, no)

(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, is it true what Mummy says?)
(You won't come back?)
(Oh no, no)

(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, is it true what Mummy says?)
(You won't come back?)
(Oh no, no)

(Grocer Jack, Grocer Jack, is it true what Mummy says?)
(You won't come back?)
(Oh no, no)

June 27, 2012

Baker Knight and the Knightmares - Hallucinations (1967)

Born in 1933, Baker Knight was a musician and songwriter so prolific, songs he wrote have been recorded by Paul McCartney, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Perry Como, Sammy Davis Jr, Ricky Nelson, Jerry Lee Lewis, and more. Together with his backing group The Knightmares, their first regional hit “Bring My Cadillac Back” was scheduled for national distribution, but failed due to stations not wanting to advertise “Cadillac” free of charge. In the late ‘60s he wrote music for the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band; in the ‘70s he wrote for country music stars; and in the ‘80s he returned home to Birmingham, Alabama where he lived out the rest of his life, suffering from agoraphobia, until passing away in 2005 at the age of seventy-two.

This song was released as a single on Warner Brothers'/Frank Sinatra's Reprise Records. As the B-Side, it featured the A-Side “I Feel Sick About the Whole Thing”.

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Baker Knight and the Knightmares - Hallucinations (1967)

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Lyrics:

Hallucinations
(Hallucinations)
(Hallucinations)

I open up my eyes and you appear to be
Standing on a distant hillside, callin’ me
I hasten to your site although my heart is full of fear
I reach for you and then you disappear

Hallucinations
They are drivin’ me insane
Hallucinations
Something’s poundin’ in my brain

Girl, I can’t believe that you don’t care
Everywhere I go, I see you standin’ there

And every night I lie awake and hope for dreams
All at once your mine again, or so it seems
You’re standing there before me sayin’ everything’s alright
I reach and then you vanish in the night

(Hallucinations)
(Hallucinations)
(Hallucinations)

I hear you speak my name and then I turn to find
You’re not really there; it’s only in my mind
It seems to be impossible to face reality
I can’t believe that you’re not here with me

Hallucinations
They are drivin’ me insane
Hallucinations
Something’s poundin’ in my brain

Girl, I can’t believe that you don’t care
Everywhere I go I see you standin’ there

Hallucinations
Hallucinations
Hallucinations
Hallucinations
Hallucinations….

June 26, 2012

Cyrus Erie - Sparrow (1969)

During the mid-1960s, Eric Carmen was a pretty big fan of Cleveland, Ohio’s biggest local band, The Choir. Previously featured on our site, The Choir once auditioned Carmen to see if he could join the band. Carmen’s audition didn’t go well and the group chose someone else. Frustrated, Carmen joined another local band, this group, and soon took them to the top as Cleveland’s most popular local band. Within a short time, Carmen would persuade The Choir’s guitarist, Wally Bryson, to join his new group. By the end of the ‘60s, both The Choir and this group had disbanded. Three guys who had been in The Choir, including Bryson, joined Carmen to create the ‘70s power pop group, Raspberries.

This song comes from the 1969 single which featured the more popular B-Side “Get the Message,” which was definitely a precursor to “Go All the Way” by the Raspberries (which you can hear here). This song features Eric Carmen, Wally Bryson, and Randy Klawon.

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Cyrus Erie - Sparrow (1969)

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Lyrics:

Sparrow, say that love's a game
Win or lose, it's all the same
If it leaves, it comes again
I don't understand

Never let her be too sure
That would be so immature
Keep her guessing, that's the way
To show you really love her

I'd like to stop these guessing games
If it's all the same to you
'cause when they're done
If you are gone
You know you'll make me feel so bad now

Sparrow, sparrow, love's a game
I don't understand

I'd like to stop these guessing games
If it's all the same to you
'cause when they're done
If you are gone
You know you'll make me blue

(Feel so bad now)
(You know you'll make me feel so bad now)

Sparrow, say it's time to go
If you care, don't let it show
Hide it so she'll never know
Then she can't hurt you

Then she can't hurt you

June 25, 2012

The Id - Don't Think Twice (1967)

This group was Jerry Cole’s attempt to get together with a few fellow session musicians he knew and have them release psychedelic rock music that they could call their own. Coming from Chicago, Illinois, Cole was often an uncredited session musician who played guitar, usually under a pseudonym, on low-budget albums. In 1965, Cole got together with Don Dexter, Glenn Cass, and Glenn’s brother Norman Cass, in attempt to start creating.

If I’ve understood what I’ve read correctly, the group recorded an enormous number of tracks between 1965 and 1966, only to have the majority of their material repackaged and rereleased by their producer and manager Paul Arnold. Arnold supposedly took many of the tracks the group recorded and released them under names such as ‘Animated Egg,’ while never giving credit to the musicians. Really showing his character, Arnold also supposedly attempted to cash in on the untimely death of Jimi Hendrix by releasing the material a second time as a tribute album to Jimi from ‘The Black Diamonds,’ a group that didn’t exist.

But before the group was separated with their music, RCA took what they considered to be the best ten tracks from the group and released them on an album titled The Inner Sounds of the Id in January 1967. This song was the first track on that album.

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The Id - Don't Think Twice (1967)

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Lyrics:

Don’t think twice about lovin’ me
If you’re not sure the first time
Don’t tell yourself you really care
You’ll make me yours forever

I’m not here to try and bring you down
And shame your name all over town
Or tell your friends of things not true
Lose my respect, no faith in you

I love you
I love you
I do

Don’t think twice about hurtin’ me
You’re not sure you want me
Don’t pretend or tell me things
You really don’t believe in

I don’t want your love if it’s not true
We both tried to find someone new
If you’re not sure or understand
That you’re my woman, I’m your man

I love you
I love you
I do

Heard this story many times
Tonight: we love
Tomorrow: lies

I don’t believe in what is wrong
‘cause if I love, my love is strong

Don’t think twice about lovin’ me
If you’re not sure the first time
Don’t tell yourself you really care
You’ll make me yours forever

I’m not here to try and bring you down
And shame your name all over town
Or tell your friends of things not true
Lose my respect, no faith in you

I love you
I love you
I do

I love you
I do
I love you
I do
I love you…

June 22, 2012

The Buckinghams - I Got a Feelin' (1968)

Billboard magazine called them “The Most Listened Band in America” in 1967. That year, they were one of the top-selling acts, releasing hit songs such as “Don’t You Care,” “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy,” “Hey Baby (They’re Playing Our Song),” and “Susan” to follow-up on their previous chart-topping hit “Kind of a Drag.” Although the end of the ‘60s coincided with the end of the band, they would reform throughout the ‘80s and can be currently found touring the United States on the wildly popular Happy Together Tour, which also features artists such as The Turtles, Mickey Dolenz of The Monkees, The Grass Roots, and Gary Puckett & the Union Gap.

Previously unreleased, this song was a track which had been worked on during the 1968 recording sessions that led to the album In One Ear and Gone Tomorrow. Though not chosen for the album, it was later included on the 1999 CD re-release. It’s easily one of my favorite songs by the group, and definitely my favorite song that wasn’t considered a big hit.

After you've read the story, read the interview, and heard the song below, see our previous post on The Buckinghams and hear "Hey Baby (They're Playing Our Song)" here!



A Special Edition post with Carl Giammarese of The Buckinghams!

Today's post is not only our eighth special edition, but also our very first interview! After some email correspondence with a very busy Carl Giammarese, who's currently on the Happy Together tour, Carl generously offered to give a story and interview to A Bit Like You And Me. Enjoy!
At 1:30pm on Thursday, June 14th, 2012, I received a phone call from an unknown name and unknown number.

“Hey, how ya doin’? This is Carl Giammarese from The Buckinghams.”

Wow! Talk about receiving a good phone call. After some cordial salutations from Carl and some nervous sputtering by me, Carl informed me that he would not only be happy to answer questions, but that he had thought of a story to share with A Bit Like You And Me.

Well, I’ll tell you a funny one that Nick and I experienced. You know, just one of the accounts where we were just starting to mature, actually- were just starting to take these bills and build a reputation in the Midwest, playing. And those were the days when, um [laughter], you know, you would drive- you would take your car with a trailer hitched up to it. And you would put all your equipment in the trailer and we would drive around the Midwest playing, you know?

And we came back one night, we had just done a show- I think somewhere in Wisconsin- I can’t remember exactly where it was, but they were dropping me off at my parents’ house. I was still living at home- and this is early in 1965. And, Nick Fortuna, his car was parked at my house. So Dennis Tufano and John Poulos were in the car [that dropped us off]. Dennis was driving with the trailer behind it and he let us off in front of my house and we got out.

Nick had opened up his car’s door- and you have to remember: he had a ’59 Chevy. And as they pulled away, the trailer caught the door and ripped the door right off its hinges! They dragged it all the way down the street! And we’re yelling behind them, but they had the radio so loud that they couldn’t hear us going after them! They dragged that door all the way down to Lawrence Avenue- this is about half a block, you know? They never stopped. They never saw it.

And Nick and I just looked at each other, shrugged, and picked up the door. We carried it back to the house, I got some rope from the house, and we tied the door up in place. They didn’t even find out what they did until the next day!

That was just a funny situation. I mean, there were a lot of little things like that that happened through the years, but that was a funny one, you know? It’s just- I feel sorry for that ’59 Chevy!

I used to have a ’54 Pontiac that the brakes never worked. And I used to come home from gigs and I’d use the back of Nick’s car to stop. This was in the city, you know, this was not any long drive. I remember one night I just wanted to get the car home and I’d just go slowly and every time he’d stop: BANG! I think the car wound up about four inches shorter by the time we got home. That was a funny thing that happened.

At this point- I don’t know what I was thinking- I decided I’d try to be funny and made some remark about how he could have cut the floor out of the bottom and attempt to stop the car like they did on The Flintstones. We gracefully moved past that fumble and headed into the Q&A portion of the phone call.

A Bit Like You And Me: I know that you were born in Chicago. Were you raised in Chicago, too?

Carl Giammarese: Yeah. I was born on the north side. You know, Nick's a north-sider, also. I grew up in the city. I was born in a neighborhood called Uptown, which is on a lake-front. I actually lived in the city until I got married and then I just moved a little bit north of the city in a suburb called Evanston, Illinois. But, yeah, I always make my home in Chicago.

ABLYAM: So does that make you a Cubs or a White Sox fan?

Carl: Cubs!

(Here, Carl starts to tell me how he's on the way to Jacksonville, Florida after having just played at the Hard Rock Live in Hollywood, Florida the night before. I geek out a bit and blurt out how I live in the area nearby and just saw him at that venue two years ago in 2010. He talks about the big crowd they had and how well the show went.)

Carl: Nick [Fortuna] here is a White Sox fan. So we'll go at it sometimes.

ABLYAM: Yeah, he's had a little bit more luck than you.

Carl: We may be the worst team in baseball.

ABLYAM: In baseball history! (laughter)

Carl: Especially this year, you know. We're doing badly. But one thing about being a Cubs fan: you're always hopeful.

ABLYAM: Yeah. Oh, trust me. I know how it feels. I'm a Red Sox fan, so, you know, I was going through the same thing for quite a while, too.

Carl: You got to see a couple of championships, though. You broke the curse!

ABLYAM: Yeah, exactly, yeah… There was another thing I was curious about. After the success of "Kind of a Drag," I was wondering how that changed your life. Was it harder to go out in public? Were people able to match your face with the person they heard singing the song?

Carl: Ah, well, it did change our lives dramatically. I think that all of a sudden we went from a local band playing around Chicago, and doing a few Midwest things here and there, and all of a sudden you're on the national stage: you're in a band, you're being asked to do TV shows, and you're playing national tours and getting the recognition. Even though we did The Buckinghams, like with any band, we could have individual identities, you know, that people loved. But back in that time (and it's more so now and through the years)- but back in '67 when it was all happening and when that was the number one song- well of course we were doing all the teen-magazine stuff and TV shows, so, people recognized you. So, yeah, we did get recognized around Chicago and at home and on the road. You know, we went through the whole Beatles' A Hard Day's Night thing- all that craziness. You couldn't hear yourself on stage, the fans would storm the stage sometimes and- I remember one time looking to my left and seeing Nick being dragged off the stage. A bunch of fans had got him. And [Nick's with me now], he just said it was one of his favorite suits! [laughter] You know, so there was a lot of not being able to hear yourself play. And then they would gather- we were still living at home with our parents. And the fans would gather at our house. To some degree it was harder for us than the superstars like The Beatles, or even more recently, Michael Jackson, where you had a lot of security around you. We didn't really have that. We were living at home, but the fans would treat us like we were the biggest thing ever. It got a little tough sometimes. But it was great.

ABLYAM: That sounds like a great time. It sounds like an absolute blast.

Carl: It was, especially '67. Ya know, '66, '67, and '68: we had a great time in those days making records and '67 was a great year. We toured almost 300 shows that year. We were constantly on the road and, between living in the studio and doing another single or an album, we were on the road. But, you know, those were the days. You don't need a lot of sleep when you're twenty years old. (laughter)

ABLYAM: Yeah. Is there a plan for recording any new music?

Carl: Well, we have. The last ten years have been interesting. We did an album called Live and Well. It was a live recording that was pretty interesting years back. A label picked it up and changed the name to Standing Room Only. So that's out there on iTunes. But we also did a Christmas album several years ago. We did the Up Close CD/DVD, which was a live performance at the Star Plaza Theater in Merrilville, Indiana. And we did an album I'm really proud of called Reaching Back. What I did was I re-recording all the hits, because I couldn't really do anything with them because Sony owns all the recordings. We just tried to do something that sounded like the record and we put it on an album with eight new songs. What we did was reached back to the sound we had in the '60s which, if not quality recordings, but, I mean, they were songs which were very similar to what we were doing in the '60s. The fans seemed to be interested. And it was fun to do that, to re-visit those chord progressions and melodies of the '60s.
So, we did Reaching Back, and of course it's all available, not only at our shows, but on iTunes and various download-sites. And we actually make money. And it's nice to have things out. You know, radio's not like it used to be.

ABLYAM: (My urge not to interrupt fails) Oh, you've got that right.

Carl: And I've been working on an autobiography for the past four years now. Getting closer to getting that out. So, you know, there's always projects. And we always talk about doing more stuff. More recordings and- I'm not sure if we will or won't.

ABLYAM: That's wonderful. It's always great to hear what new ideas you guys are coming up with.

Carl: Yeah, it's just so different now. We're not going to sell the kind of numbers we did in the '60s. But you have to keep being creative. You have to keep doing things. You do it more for yourself than anything else. You need to create music, so that's what we do. And of course we keep trying to improve on our live performances and do different things. We still play a lot of dates and with this Happy Together tour, we have about fifty dates.

(Sparking my memory when he mentioned the Happy Together tour, I start to tell Carl about the time I called Flo (from The Turtles' Flo & Eddie) a few weeks prior on his personal cell phone, hoping, but failing, to get a story from him for A Bit Like You And Me. The nice guy that he is, Carl tells me that he'll send over some contact information for the public relations guy in charge of PR for the Happy Together tour. Maybe, he says, I can get some stories from the other guys on the tour. I praise him with thanks and the conversation wraps up.)

ABLYAM: Well, I appreciate this very much. It was very, very nice of you to talk to us.

Carl: No problem. You take care and I'll send you [PR guy's] email address.

ABLYAM: Okay, I appreciate it! Thank you very much.

Carl: Alrighty! Take care.

ABLYAM: Bye.

Carl: Bye.
That was definitely an exciting phone call. I can't thank Carl enough for his generosity and willingness to take time out of his day to call me, share a story, and answer questions. It was incredibly nice of him and made for one heck of a post!

To visit Carl's site, click here.
To follow Carl on Facebook, click here.
To visit The Buckinghams' site, click here.
To purchase both Carl's and The Buckinghams' latest music, click here and here, respectively.
To support our site, you can buy The Buckinghams' music on Amazon through our affiliate site here.
To see if the Happy Together Tour is coming to a city near you, click here.

And now that you've enjoyed this exclusive story, why not check out what other exclusive stories we've received?



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The Buckinghams - I Got a Feelin' (1968)

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Lyrics:

Somethin' in the way you look
Reads just like an open book
Somethin' in that book I read
Tells me it's not me you need

Somethin' in the things you say
Tells me we're goin' different ways
Somethin' in the things you do
Tells me that I'm losin' you

I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that there's somethin' on your mind
I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that you're leavin' me behind

Somethin' in your touch has changed
Don't know what, but somethin's strange
Somethin's funny that I feel
Tells my wounds I'm gonna heal

I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that there's somethin' on your mind
I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that you're leavin' me behind

We used to laugh like children
And live a life of love
We used to walk in sunshine
And never have enough
Of the times we had together
But the things are getting’ tough

I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that there's somethin' on your mind
I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that you're leavin' me behind

I got a feelin' that we're headin' for bad times
I got a feelin' that there's somethin' on your mind
I got a feelin' that we’re…

June 21, 2012

The Misty Wizards - It's Love (1967)

Dick Keelan and Ted Lucas first met at the Retort Club in Detroit, Michigan. Appearing as solo performers on the same bill one night, they became fast friends after finding a common interest in East Indian music. The friends were temporarily split when Ted moved to California for nine months, but when reunited again in Detroit, they formed The Spike Drivers with three other local musicians. After a year and a half of performing in both Detroit and New York, Keelan and Lucas split themselves from the group, thus creating this band.

After Dick and Ted formed this duo, they went out to California where they learned how to play sitar from the great Ravi Shankar. Given their penchant for raga-styled music, it comes as no surprise that this song has a raga element to it. It was released on a single featuring the B-side “Blue Law Sunday” in July 1967.

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The Misty Wizards - It's Love (1967)

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Lyrics:

When I awoke this morning
Do you know what I found?
Glasses filled with colored sights and sound

And as I looked around me
Nothing new I see
Only in the way it seems to be

There’s something in the morning
Different from the rest
Something that makes this one seem the best

Do you know the feelin’?
(Do you know?)
That rocks you while it’s reelin’?
(Do you know?)
Reelin’, thievin’, even stealin’ from my heart

It’s love
It’s love
(Yes, it’s love)
It’s love
(Yes, it’s love)
It’s love
(Yes, it’s love)
It’s love
(Yes, it’s love)
It’s love
(Yes, it’s love)
It’s love
(Yes, it’s love)
It’s love

It’s love!
It’s love!
It’s love!
Don’t you know it’s love?!

When I awoke this morning
Do you know what I found?
Glasses filled with colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)
Colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)
Colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)
Colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)
Colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)
Colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)
Colored sights and sound
(Colored sights and sound)…

June 20, 2012

White Noise - Love Without Sound (1969)

Formed in London in 1968 by an American, David Vorhaus, this group was an experimental electronic band which used all kinds of tape manipulation techniques and “instruments” to painstakingly create music note by note. Vorhaus, a classically trained bass player who fled to the UK to avoid being drafted, also had a background in physics and electronic engineering. Their first album, An Electric Storm, did not sell well initially. In years since, it has become a cult item to electronic music aficionados and has since sold hundreds of thousands of copies. If their music had been made more recently, it may not be that impressive, but considering what techniques they used and what they were able to do in the late ‘60s, their labor-intensive work is definitely noteworthy.

This track was the opening song to the group’s first album, An Electric Storm. Originally intending to only create a single, the group was persuaded by a much invested Island Records to create an entire album. When tracks three through six took a year to create, Island Records panicked and demanded a completed album right away. The group threw together the seventh and final track in one day and submitted their work. If the group ever had a signature song, this opening track from their first album would probably be it.

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White Noise - Love Without Sound (1969)

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Lyrics:

(Sound, sound, sound)
(Without sound, without sound, without sound)
(Love without sound, love without sound, love without sound)

Beyond the outside was one left to right
Within ourselves the suns or the night
Just bound by blue ethereality
Drifting onto my dream, free
(Dream free, dream free)

My mind explored her labyrinth eyes
Her sundrenched body lay hypnotized
Perfumed electric garden ‘roused female
But now the laughter turns pale

Dreams gone just melting fever in my soul
Within my head the bell seems to toll
Fast-breathing, wreathing, grooving hippies down
Now making love without sound
(Sound, sound)
(Without sound, without sound, without sound, without sound)
(Love without sound, Love without sound, Love without sound, without sound)

It never had been made like that before
Our maiden knighthood longing bright for more
Her leg stood firm, the dead wind sighed, “Come on”
Mistral away, now she's gone

June 19, 2012

Tom Paxton - Whose Garden Was This (1970)

Born in 1937 and raised in a small town in Oklahoma, this folk legend never attempted to conform to the emerging “folk rock” genre that became popular in the mid-‘60s. Although our previous post on him gives the general summary of who he was, it is pointed out here that Tom Paxton admitted that he never had the “rock mentality.” The most he ever experimented with his folk music was by incorporating some string instruments and horns. Known as the “Baroque” period of his career, he quickly returned to his folk roots after two experimental albums.

This song comes from Paxton’s “Baroque folk” period. Specifically, it was on his album titled 6 released in 1970. It was composed as an environmentalist anthem, both written and originally performed by Paxton in honor of the first-ever Earth Day. Paxton’s use of imagery poignantly warns what may come if we don’t protect our planet. As much of a foreboding warning as it is a beautiful song, this is my favorite Tom Paxton track. If it’s your first time hearing the song, turn up the volume and lose yourself in the haunting lyrics.

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Tom Paxton - Whose Garden Was This (1970)

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Lyrics:

Whose garden was this?
It must have been lovely
Did it have flowers?
I've seen pictures of flowers
And I'd love to have smelled one

Whose river was this?
You say it ran freely?
Blue was its color?
I've seen blue in some pictures
And I'd love to have been there

Ah, tell me again I need to know
The forest had trees, the meadows were green
The oceans were blue, and birds really flew
Can ya swear that was true?

Whose grey sky was this?
Or was it a blue one?
Nights there were breezes?
I've heard records of breezes
And you tell me you've felt one?

Ah, tell me again I need to know
The forest had trees, the meadows were green
The oceans were blue, and birds really flew
Can ya swear that was true?

Whose garden was this?
It must have been lovely
Did it have flowers?
I've seen pictures of flowers
And I'd love to have smelled one

June 18, 2012

The Safaris - Image of a Girl (1960)

Formed in 1959, this group was only a one-hit wonder. Coming out of Los Angeles, California, they released the song heard below in 1960 on Eldo Records and watched it cruise to number six on the Billboard Hot 100. With high hopes, the group put out another song, “Girl with the Story in Her Eyes,” the same year only to watch it flop. Two songs in 1961 had the same ill-fated demise. Disappointed with their lack of success, they changed their name to The Suddens and tried one last time to release a song in 1961. Unfortunately, it flopped as well and the group became nothing more than a fond memory.

It’s unfortunate that this song, written by members Richard Clasky and Marvin Rosenberg, was the first release to be put out by the group. If it had been one of their later releases, the group could have celebrated their success after having a few bumps in the road. But, as it is, the group started with success and unfortunately failed to ever reach it again.

[Update 01/09/2015: Alan Brackett of The Peanut Butter Conspiracy left some interesting anecdotes in the comments section below.]

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The Safaris - Image of a Girl (1960)

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Lyrics:

As I lie awake resting from the day
I can hear the clock passing time away
Oh, I couldn't sleep, for on my mind
Was the image of the girl I hope to find
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh

I look straight up at the ceiling above
Thinking of the girl whom I will love
Oh, would it be soon when she exists?
The image of the girl I've always wished
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh

I twisted and I turned, ooh, trying to sleep
But all I could do was only to weep
For I haven't found that image yet
Of all the girls that I have met

And now the clock is still passing time
And I know someday that she will be mine
And I know she'll always bring me love
For she's the image of the girl I love
Whoa, (image of a girl) oh, oh, oh, oh

Whoa, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh (image of a girl) oh, oh, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh (image of a girl)
Whoa, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh (image of a girl)…

June 15, 2012

Beauregard Ajax - Is Tomorrow Thursday? (1968)

When I attempted to locate information about this group to write up a biography, I couldn’t find much of anything. I was able to figure out that the group was from California, that they only made one album, and that they broke up before it was even released. Luckily for us (and you), I was able to contact the group’s drummer, Leo Hartshorn, and all of the missing gaps came together.

This song is the fifth track from the group’s only album, Deaf Priscilla, which was recorded in 1968. It was my original intention to post their song “Goodbye Again,” but after learning Leo had a penchant for “Is Tomorrow Thursday?,” it only made sense to feature it instead. And now for the exclusive story!



A Special Edition post with Leo Hartshorn from Beauregard Ajax!

Our lucky seventh story! We are proud to present a very entertaining story from the drummer of Beauregard Ajax, Leo Hartshorn! Leo, now a Reverend Doctor, was kind enough to share a great story at great length regarding his time in Beauregard Ajax. You'll all definitely enjoy this one!
A Bit Like You And Me and readers,

I appreciate the contact and that you have enjoyed the Beauregard Ajax album! It took Shaddoks Records in Germany to resurrect our music from some old copied tapes of an album that was recorded in 1968, but never released until some 35 years later! I'm glad another younger generation has gotten the chance to appreciate what we did as young people in the ‘60s.

Here's my story:

My ‘60s rock group, Beauregard Ajax, was originally named "The Dumplings" by our lead singer Charlie Hendrix. Everyone hated that name but him. The group was formed when I was a senior at Hueneme High School in Oxnard/Port Hueneme, California with David Ferguson (singer, guitarist, sonwriter), John Boutell (rhythm guitar, singer), Charlie Hendrix (lead singer, recorder player, songwriter), and myself, Leo Hartshorn (drums). We played local gigs in the Ventura County area with the help of Jim Salzer, a local promoter, with one major gig being with The Byrds at Earl Warren Showgrounds.

Our group moved to LA in 1968 to record the album now entitled Deaf Priscilla (unnamed in '68) at Del-Fi Records near Hollywood and Vine with producer Bob Keane (Richie Valens, Bobby Fuller Four, Frank Zappa, Barry White). We were desperate to play anywhere we could, as long as we got to play our music. We played at some of the traditional ‘60s clubs in LA like Gazzarri's, The Troubador, Whisky-a-Go-Go, and some local concerts. At the time I was only 19 years old and we had to "work around" playing in some of the clubs that served alcohol. Somehow we got set up to play at the Pink Pussycat on the Sunset Strip, which not only had alcohol but also strippers! Needless to say, when they found out that some in our band were underage, we got kicked out of the club. We weren't able to finish but a few songs from our set of music even though the strippers said they liked our music!

Another gig done out of this desperation to simply play our music before a live audience was playing in a shack out in the desert! I don't remember the details, but we were invited to play for a Hells Angels party! I was a bit nervous knowing that fights could break out at any moment. But again, desperation to play took precedence over where and for whom to play or consideration of our own safety. I was hoping to make it out alive and with instruments in one piece! This time we got to play our whole set of music and were graciously treated to barbecued chicken and cordial conversation afterward. One friendly Hells Angel we talked to had his jaw wired shut from a brawl he got into with a rival motorcycle club member! There were no fights during our performance....until later, that is, after we left. We heard there was a big all-out brawl with some rival club members which tore up the party! But we made it out alive!

That was a rather "interesting" part of my young life, particularly considering I have been a Christian minister for the past 40 years!

Peace,

Rev. Dr. Leo Hartshorn
It certainly sounds like Leo and Beauregard Ajax were having a great time. Was that an entertaining story, or what? I'd like to give a huge thanks to Leo for taking the time to share his memories with A Bit Like You And Me. It was very kind of him!

To visit Leo's blog, check it out here.
To learn about Leo's Drumming for Peace endeavor, which teaches peace through drumming, rhythm, and storytelling, click here.
Lastly, to visit Leo's art page, which I highly recommend, click here.

And now that you've enjoyed this exclusive story, why not check out what other exclusive stories we've received?



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Beauregard Ajax - Is Tomorrow Thursday? (1968)

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Lyrics:

Working for the Madam; she’s a lady
Thursdays, ahh the work is not too bad
Sundays, take her poodles for a walk
Is tomorrow Thursday at all?

Madam wants the windows cleaned on Friday
Tuesday morning, drive her into town
Coming to her beckon and her call
Is tomorrow Thursday at all?

Take a trip and get away
Laugh until my head begins to sway
Stop the work and start to play
Happens every Thursday

Madam wants the gardens done on Wednesday
Saturday is boring as can be
Take her to the bridge club or the mall
Is tomorrow Thursday at all?

June 14, 2012

Dick Dale & The Del-Tones - Misirlou (1962)

Born in 1937, this man is nicknamed The King of the Surf Guitar. An actual surfer in his youth, he wanted to try and harness the sound that he heard in his head while riding waves. His song “Let’s Go Trippin’” is regarded as the first-ever surf rock song, dated to May 31, 1958. His desire to create a unique use of reverberation, which is now synonymous with surf music, led to the Leo Fender creating the very first-ever amp/loud-speaker combination that jumped the volume up from the standard maximum of four, to ten. To this day, at the age of seventy-five, he still performs high-energy shows, touring the United States.

This song was originally performed by Michalis Patrinos in Greece, in 1927. It was rearranged as an American surf rock song by Dale in 1962 after a young fan challenged Dale to play a song using only one guitar string. Remembering his Lebanese-American uncle playing this song with only one string on an oud, Dale played this song. Soon after, it was introduced to a wider audience when he played it on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1963, becoming the first rock guitarist to perform on the show.

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Dick Dale & The Del-Tones - Misirlou (1962)

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Lyrics:

(instrumental)

June 13, 2012

Tintern Abbey - Vacuum Cleaner (1967)

Coming from London, England, this group was only active from 1967 until 1968 before breaking up. In their short time, they were only able to release one single. The single, released in December 1967, featured the A-side, “Beeside,” and the B-side heard below. The group intended for another single to be released in April of 1968, but it never came together. To make up for their lack of a release, the group hoped to put out a full length album in August 1968, but that too wasn’t meant to be as the group had disbanded by that time.

As mentioned, this song is the B-side to a single released by the group in December 1967. It currently appears on many ‘60s psychedelic music compilations, most notably Nuggets II: Original Artyfacts from the British Empire and Beyond, 1964–1969. The original single it appeared on is currently sought after by collectors. If you have a copy, it could be worth well over US$1,000.

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Tintern Abbey - Vacuum Cleaner (1967)

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Lyrics:

Everybody's got new clothes
Make’ me feel kind of old
But in my heart, I really know
No, clothes don't buy my soul
Fix me up with your sweet dose
Now I'm feelin' like a ghost

Break it up, break it up
Let's have it now, girl
Don't you know I need it
All the time?

Fix me up with your sweet dose
Now I'm feelin' like a ghost
Whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa
(All the time)

Now my head is really spinnin’
Maybe now I'll show some willing
To help you with the house work
If you want to

Break it up, break it up
Let's have it now, girl
Don't you know I need it
All the time?

Fix me up with your sweet dose
Now I'm feelin' like a ghost
Whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa
(All the time)
All the time

All the time

Everybody's got new clothes
Make’ me feel kind of old
But in my heart I really know
No, clothes don't buy my soul
Fix me up with your sweet dose
Now I'm feelin' like a ghost

Break it up, break it up
Let's have it now, girl
Don't you know I need it
All the time?

Fix me up with your sweet dose
Now I'm feelin' like a ghost
Whoa whoa whoa whoa
(All the time)
All the time
All the time

June 12, 2012

Bloos Magoos - So I'm Wrong And You Are Right (1965)

Formed by Bronx schoolmates in 1964 as The Trenchcoats, this group was one of the first bands creating psychedelic music alongside The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream in 1966. They dabbled with the spelling “Bloos Magoos” before eventually settling on the more straight-forward and well-remembered “Blues Magoos.” In 1967, they were the opening act for a tour which featured The Who and headlined Herman’s Hermits. By 1968, after releasing three albums, the group was discouraged with declining sales and split apart. Oddly, both sides of the split continued to record and release music under the Blues Magoos name, until each called it quits again around 1971.

While attempting to capitalize on the success of their late ’66 single, “(We Ain’t Got) Nothin’ Yet,” the group re-released this song, which they had recorded years prior. Although officially released in February 1967 under the “Blues Magoos” name, it was first released in 1965 while the group was still using “Bloos Magoos.” Given that it’s a recording from the group’s earlier years, there’s no farfisa organ or hard psychedelic guitar which the group would be known for by that time. This is Blues Magoos before they discovered their signature sound.

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Bloos Magoos - So I'm Wrong And You Are Right (1965)

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Lyrics:

So I'm wrong and you are right
You see no reason to have fright
So I'm wrong and you are right
So what I still can't sleep at night?

I'm tryin’ to do my studies in-between my fear
Of being shipped to Saigon or some town right here
It's hard to read a book with a gun in my hand
I wanna get married but I can't make my plan

So I'm wrong and you are right
You see no reason to have fright
So I'm wrong and you are right
So what I still can't sleep at night?

I ask you for a place where I can hide
In case somebody gets us from a blind side
I ask you with whom I should confide
And all I get is “Information Classified”

So I'm wrong and you are right
You see no reason to have fright
So I'm wrong and you are right
So what I still can't sleep at night?

The U.N. delegation- they just bang and shout
The little people's voices- they’s all drowned out
Crisis, crisis, burnin’ bright
But who is really wrong and who is really right?

So I'm wrong and you are right
You see no reason to have fright
So I'm wrong and you are right
So what I still can't sleep at night?

So I'm wrong and you are right
So I'm wrong and you are right
(Hey!)

June 11, 2012

The Aerovons - World of You (1969)

In 1966, five high-school students from St. Louis, Missouri formed a band. In 1967, after releasing a demo, they rejected an offer from Capitol Records to record an album in Los Angeles. They were hoping to record at Abbey Road Studios, where their idols The Beatles worked. In 1968, the group flew to London and got their wish, receiving offers from both EMI (who they signed with) and Decca. By 1969, the group had lost two members, but began recording the album as a three-piece act. EMI, concerned about the group’s stability, canceled the release of the album indefinitely. Parlophone released two of their singles, but more fortunately for us, the album was released in its entirety by RPM in 2003.

Their long unreleased album, titled Resurrection, was shelved for nearly forty years before finally being released on CD by RPM. Due to the group’s infatuation with The Beatles, it comes as no surprise that their music sounded a lot like The Beatles’ late ‘60s work. This song, probably the best by the group, was the first track on Resurrection.

[Update: Tom Hartman of The Aerovons gave A Bit Like You And Me five exclusive stories! To read them, you can visit our Exclusive Stories page or start with the first story. Enjoy!]

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The Aerovons - World of You (1969)

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Lyrics:

It’s a new world of you
And I’m just a stranger here
It’s a new thing to do
And I’m being quite sincere

Though I know I’m far from home
I’m going to say
“til tomorrow
Tomorrow”

Without cost or obligation
I will turn my resignation
In to you
Without sorrow

No reason to be blue

It’s a new world of you
And I’m just a stranger here
It’s a new thing to do
And I’m being quite sincere

There were no maps
Or drawn directions
And your potions for protection
Leading my path

There’ll be no easy road returning
To that world of rapid yearning
That I’ve known
Never learning

And you can stay, too

It’s a new world of you
And I’m just a stranger here
It’s a new thing to do
And I’m being quite sincere

June 08, 2012

Neil Young with Crazy Horse - Cinnamon Girl (1969)

Born in 1945, this Canadian singer-songwriter is one of the most influential artists to emerge out of the ‘60s music scene. In 1966, he co-founded Buffalo Springfield with Stephen Stills and Richie Furay. In 1968, he began to release what would become a very long catalog of solo work. In 1969, he joined Crosby, Stills & Nash. He has done countless charitable works for those in need, has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice (as a member of Buffalo Springfield and as a solo artist), and has even been labeled the “Godfather of Grunge” for his influence on the grunge music scene. Clearly, this man has more on his résumé than what this small space could indicate.

This song was written by Neil Young while suffering from a 103° fever. Before being released as a single in 1970, it appeared on his 1969 album Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere. It was his first album to feature his backing group Crazy Horse, and, besides this track, also featured the hit song “Down By the River.”

Are you familiar with Paul McCartney’s current guitar player, Brian Ray? This song was written for (and about) his older sister, Jean Ray, from the folk duo Jim and Jean.



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Neil Young with Crazy Horse - Cinnamon Girl (1969)

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Lyrics:

I wanna live with a cinnamon girl
I could be happy the rest of my life
With a cinnamon girl

A dreamer of pictures, I run in the night
You see us together, chasing the moonlight
My cinnamon girl

Ten silver saxes, a bass with a bow
The drummer relaxes and waits between shows for
His cinnamon girl

A dreamer of pictures, I run in the night
You see us together, chasing the moonlight
My cinnamon girl

Pa sent me money, now
I'm gonna make it somehow
I need another chance
You see, your baby loves to dance
Yeah
Yeah
Yeah

June 07, 2012

Mason Williams - Classical Gas (1970)

Born in 1938, this man has been a comedy writer for both The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and Saturday Night Live (briefly in 1980). He is also a noted poet, a lyricist, and most popularly remembered for his hit instrumental track heard below. He wrote songs for The Kingston Trio, released an album with Mannheim Steamroller, and “discovered” comedian Steve Martin by hiring him (and paying him out of his own pocket) as a writer for the Smothers Brothers’ show.

Originally released in 1968 on The Mason Williams Phonograph Record, this song won three Grammy Awards in 1969. It was often played by Williams on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, which contributed to its popularity. Since, it has been re-recorded and re-released many times over the years. This particular version of the song was re-constructed by Williams to be a solo acoustic guitar piece and appeared on his 1970 album Handmade. Personally, I prefer this acoustic guitar version over the original.

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Mason Williams - Classical Gas (1970)

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Lyrics:

(instrumental)

June 06, 2012

The Gordian Knot - The Year of the Sun (1968)

This group first met at Ole Miss, the University of Mississippi, in 1964. Their lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter was Ole Miss’ All-American quarterback, Jim Weatherly. In 1967, the group got their big break out in Los Angeles, where they had relocated, after being hired to play at a party being hosted by Nancy Sinatra. Sinatra liked the group so much she asked them to accompany her on a USO trip to entertain the American soldiers in Vietnam. Despite only releasing one album, the group also starred as themselves in the 1968 movie Young Runaways.

This song comes from the group’s only album, Tones, released in 1968. It was produced by the ex-member of The Hi-Los, Clark Burroughs, and was released by the record company Verve. The five group members were lead guitarist Pat Kincade, drummer Dulin Commodore Lancaster, Jr., pianist/organist J.D. Lobue, bassist Leland Russell, and lead vocalist James “Jim” Dexter Weatherly.

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The Gordian Knot - The Year of the Sun (1968)

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Lyrics:

Through the morning fog
I thought I saw her
A moment of reality
To beckon me

I began to run
To try and find her
But I only seem to make her fade
Into the haze

Just like you’re hearing the things that you said
In search of something you left behind
While you are acting, this book must be read
A beauty is drifting into your mind

Recalling the year of the sun
(Recalling the year of the sun)
(The year of the sun)
The year of the sun

Now these lonely walls are slowly turning
The river of the southern wind
Calls me again

Battles of the past are moving closer
A tender voice begins to say
“Come and play”
(Come and play)

Just like a portal that clogs your mind
Piece by piece it won’t fit in
It keeps you dreaming all of the time
Floating through places you’ve been

Recalling the year of the sun
(Recalling the year of the sun)
(The year of the sun)
The year of the sun

The year of the sun
The year of the sun
The year of the sun
The year of the sun
The year of the sun
The year of the sun…

June 05, 2012

Pearls Before Swine - Where Is Love [Demo] (1967)

Formed in 1965, this psychedelic folk band took their name from a verse in the Bible: “Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine...,” which basically meant not to give things to people who are unworthy or would not appreciate what you’ve given them. Coming out of Eau Gallie, Florida (now considered Melbourne, FL) the group was created by high-schooler Tom Rapp and his friends. Rapp has the honor of having inspired an Elton John hit-song. When Elton John and Bernie Taupin (Elton’s lyricist) wrote the song “Rocket Man,” it was because they had been inspired by Rapp’s song of the same name. Much earlier in life, Rapp also beat Bob Dylan in a talent contest in Rochester, Minnesota. At the age of six, Rapp came in third place, while "Bobby Zimmerman," Dylan, came in fifth.

This song was recorded on a tape recorder in somebody’s home in either 1967 or 1968. After being lost to time for many years, it reappeared for the 2004 compilation album, The Wizard of Is, which featured numerous home demos and unreleased tracks. Prior to the song’s release, Rapp couldn’t remember the song, though he was able to verify that it was him singing. He also verified that it was “Elisabeth and Wayne Harley singing harmony” and that it was a “really nice arrangement.”

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Pearls Before Swine - Where Is Love [Demo] (1967)

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Lyrics:

The flower children
Have opened up their hearts
While the iron monster
Was eating up the parts
And the cowboy
Was gunning in the east

And where is love?
Where is love?
Where are you?

The mushroom people
Are working out a plot
They plan to steal tomorrow
If they don’t get caught
The silent accomplice
Rains on their every need

And where is love?
Where is love?
Where are you?

Madam S. reads fortunes
In bed, but nothing’s solved
She says that “God’s not dead
He just won’t get involved”
“But you,” she says, “can change the world
By merely reaching out”

And where is love?
Where is love?
And where are you?

June 04, 2012

The Leathercoated Minds - Non-Stop (1967)

This “group” is remembered as a project that was rushed together to capitalize on the 1966 psychedelic L.A. music scene by a small record company called Viva. Releasing only one album, two men were primarily responsible for what was put out: producer Snuff Garrett and a young musician, J.J. Cale (Not the same John Cale as that in The Velvet Underground). Titled A Trip Down the Sunset Strip, the album got its name because, as remembered by Garrett, “we had a real good shot (picture) of Sunset Boulevard and we needed an album to go with it.”

Cale, who would later be remembered for authoring “After Midnight” and “Cocaine” (later popularized by Eric Clapton) composed four instrumental tracks to accompany the eight cover-songs on the album. This song is one of those instrumental tracks. Besides writing the songs, Cale also produced and played guitar on them.

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The Leathercoated Minds - Non-Stop (1967)

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Lyrics:

(instrumental)

June 01, 2012

The Beach Boys - Feel Flows (1971)

At their highest peak in the mid-‘60s, this band threatened The Beatles in both terms of commercial and critical success. Soon after their release of one of rock’s greatest albums, Pet Sounds (1966), the group’s frontman, Brian Wilson, began to lose control of the group—and himself. Years of substance abuse had either contributed or coincidentally aligned to his deteriorating mental health. As a result, the band’s rumored masterpiece-in-the-works, Smile, would be shelved for forty-four years. Luckily for us, the songs of the Smile sessions were reconstructed and released in 2011, the band has another album coming out this coming Tuesday (June 5th) (That’s Why God Made the Radio), and Brian Wilson is fondly remembered as a songwriter in the same echelon as Lennon/McCartney—where he deserves to be.

This song comes from the band’s seventeenth studio album, Surf’s Up. It was primarily a solo composition written and sung by Carl Wilson (with partial writing credit given to Jack Rieley). Given the immensely large catalog of incredible songs put out by this group, there are a handful of wonderful tracks that I feel haven’t received the full attention they deserve. I believe this to be one of those songs.

To hear, in my opinion, another overlooked song by The Beach Boys, check out our previous post here featuring the a capella demo of “Forever,” sang by Dennis Wilson.

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The Beach Boys - Feel Flows (1971)

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Lyrics:

Unfolding enveloping missiles of soul
Recall senses sadly
Mirage-like soft blue-like lanterns below
To light the way, gladly
Whether whistling heaven's clouds disappear
Where the wind withers memory
Whether whiteness whisks soft shadows away

Feel goes
(White hot glistening shadowy flow)
Feel flows
(Black hot glistening shadowy glow)

Unbending, never-ending tablets of time
Record all the yearning
Unfearing, all-appearing message divine
Eases the burning
Whether willing witness waits at my mind
Whether hope dampens memory
Whether wondrous will stands tall at my side

Feel flows
(White hot glistening shadowy flow)
Feel goes
(Black hot glistening shadowy glows)

(Yeah, yeah)

Encasing all embracing wreath of repose
Engulfs all the senses
Imposing, unclosing thoughts that compose
Retire the fences
Whether wholly heartened life fades away
Whether harps heal the memory
Whether wholly heartened life fades away
Whether wondrous will stands tall at my side
Whether whiteness whisks soft shadows away

Feel goes
(White hot glistening shadowy flow)
Feel flows
(Black hot glistening shadowy glow)

Feel goes
(White hot glistening shadowy flow)
Feelings to grow
(Black hot glistening shadowy flow)

White hot glistening shadowy glow
White hot glistening shadowy glow
White hot glistening shadowy glow