A Bit Like You And Me Radio

March 30, 2012

Davie Allan & The Arrows - Blues' Theme (1966)

Davie Allan created the guitar’s fuzz sound. Link Wray before him had started the distortion of guitars, but it was Davie Allan who took the distortion further and created the famous fuzz noise. Almost always backed by The Arrows, which consisted of varying musicians, his career started doing soundtrack instrumentals to teen biker and surf movies in the ‘60s. The pioneering techniques he used to create the fuzz sound would later become a staple of ‘70s and ‘80s hard rock.

The song heard at the end of this post was the breakthrough song that brought this group into the spotlight. It was the opening theme song to the film The Wild Angels and first brought widespread notice to Allan’s ‘new’ fuzz sound. It stayed on the Billboard music charts for seventeen weeks, and interestingly, was one of the first songs learned on guitar by a young Eddie Van Halen.



A Special Edition post with Davie Allan!

I am proud to introduce our fifth exclusive story from another legendary '60s rocker! Today's awesome collection of thoughts comes from the pioneer of fuzz, Davie Allan! Check out his story and then listen to "Blues Theme" below!
A Bit Like You And Me and readers,

All it took for me to know what I wanted to do with my life was seeing Elvis the first time. The first record I bought was “All Shook Up” and my first guitar was made by Emenee. It was basically a four string toy that had Elvis’ picture on it. It was useless except for getting me started, but, oh, how I wish I had held on to it!

When I graduated from the surf sound (which may not be the correct term, since I was doing things like “Apache” and “Ghost Riders In the Sky”), the big change was our soundtrack from The Wild Angels. I loved what Duane Eddy had been doing with low notes and I tried to take them to another plateau with my added distortion. My attempt was to create a sound that imitated what I imagined a motorcycle might sound like if it were a musical instrument.

My 1965 Fender, “Jazzmaster” (funny, I don’t play any ”jazz” at all!), has been modified to take the surf out of it. With it being forty-seven years old, it still looks as gnarly as it sounds.

I call my music "melodic grunge" and Little Steven gave me an interesting comment when we were doing Fuzz for the Holidays in '04. He had come out here to help put together a track for Christmas with the Kranks and I said something about making mistakes in my recordings and not repairing them. He replied, "We all think they're part of the songs and wonder how you came up with them.”

Speaking of "Blues Theme," we opened Little Steven’s "Underground Garage Festival" in New York that same year with "Blues Theme" and he said “now that's the way to start a show!” He closes his radio show with the tune.

For forty-plus years, many people have said that the melody in "Blues Theme" was lifted (or stolen) from the guitar lick in "Last Train To Clarksville" [by The Monkees]. How about this bit of trivia: "Last Train to Clarksville" was recorded on July 25th, 1966 and The Wild Angels (featuring "Blues Theme") hit the theaters on July 20th, 1966.

Davie
It's always wonderful when somebody takes the time to share a story with A Bit Like You And Me. I'd like to thank Davie whole-heatedly for going above and beyond with his correspondence and sincerity toward sharing some great '60s music stories!

And guess what else! Davie Allan himself will sign every CD sold on his website. Check out his website here, and be sure to check out the merchandise, here, including his latest album, Retrophonic 3!

And now that you've enjoyed this exclusive story, why not check out what other exclusive stories we've received?



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Davie Allan & The Arrows - Blues' Theme (1966)

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Lyrics:

(instrumental)

March 29, 2012

Clarence Carter - Slip Away (1968)

Born in Alabama in 1936, this soulful singer and songwriter was completely blind. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in music in 1960 and began releasing a string of (unsuccessful) singles over the next few years. Finally in 1967 he signed with Fame Records and began to release successful material. His first hit, heard below, was followed by several more successes, earning his place as a respected soul artist. After the popularity of disco passed in the ‘70s, he formed a comeback with his well-known 1985 hit, “Strokin’”.

This song was released as a single in 1968 and featured the B-side “Funky Fever”. It reached number six on the pop charts.

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Clarence Carter - Slip Away (1968)

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Lyrics:

What would I give
For just a few moments?
What would I give
Just to have you near?

Tell me you would try
To slip away somehow
Oh I need you darling
I want to see you right now

Can you slip away?
Slip away
Slip away
Oh I need you so

Love, oh love
How sweet it is
When you steal it, darlin’
Let me tell you how sweet it is

Now I know it's wrong
The things I ask you to do
But please believe me, darling
I don't mean to hurt you

But just- can you slip away
Without him knowin’ you' gone?
Maybe we can meet somewhere
Somewhere where we both are not known

Can you slip away?
Slip away
Slip away
I need you so

Oh can you slip away, baby?
I'd like to see you right now, darling
Can you slip away, baby?
‘Cause I got to- got to see you
I feel a deep burning inside
Oh I wish you could slip away

Ooh, I wish you could slip away…

March 28, 2012

Scott McKenzie - No, No, No, No, No (1967)

Growing up in New York in the mid-1950s, Scott McKenzie’s first group was The Singing Strings with Tim Rose. Later, with his childhood friend John Phillips, he formed a doo wop group called The Abstracts and recorded two singles. Sticking with his friend Phillips, they would later form The Journeymen, which recorded three albums. Disbanding in 1964, McKenzie wanted to move forward with a solo career. Phillips moved to Los Angeles and formed The Mamas and The Papas, whereas McKenzie would follow two years later and release “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers In Your Hair),” which you can read about and hear on our site.

Although primarily remembered for his worldwide hit mentioned above, McKenzie would find marginal success with his next single release, “Like an Old Time Movie.” Compiling his two hits with other recordings he had been working on, he released his first album, The Voice of Scott McKenzie, in 1967. This song comes from that album.

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Scott McKenzie - No, No, No, No, No (1967)

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Lyrics:

She is like the doll
She says, “No, no, no, no”
And though she’d like to fall
She says, “No, no, no, no”
She says, “You are just a friend to me”
“You’re no more than a friend to me”

She is the doll
Who says, “No, no, no, no”
And though she tries to fall
She says, “No, no, no, no”
I know she tries to hide from me
And hopes that I won’t see

Without even hearing
She says, “No, no, no”
Without even looking
She says, “No, no, no, no”
I know- I know she is afraid with me
Afraid she might say ‘yes’ to me

Yes, she is the doll
Who says, “No, no, no, no”
And though she’d like to fall
She says, “No, no, no, no”

“No, no, no, no”
“No, no, no, no”
She says, “No, no, no, no”

March 27, 2012

Dave Mason - Sad and Deep as You [Live] (1971)

This artist has played and recorded with some of music’s most prominent names: The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Michael Jackson, George Harrison, and Jimi Hendrix, the last of with whom he was good friends with. His start in the music industry was highlighted by his band, Traffic, with which he always had a rocky relationship. Hits written by Mason with Traffic include “Feelin’ Alright” and “Hole in My Shoe,” while he also had solo success with “We Just Disagree”.

Today’s song was originally heard on Mason’s first solo album, Alone Together, released in 1970. This particular version, however, was recorded in 1971, live, and first released on the album Scrapbook (1972). Since Scrapbook was never made into a digital format, this live version of the song was first heard (in a digital format) on the 2006 compilation album, The Definitive Collection.

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Dave Mason - Sad and Deep as You [Live] (1971)

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Lyrics:

Lips that are as warm could be
Lips that speak too soon
Lips that tell a story
As sad and deep as you

Smile that's warm as summer sun
Smile that gets you through
Smile that tells a story
As sad and deep as you

The eyes that are the windows
Eyes that are the view
Eyes that tell a story
As sad and deep as you

Tears that are unspoken words
The tears that are the truth
Tears that tell a story
As sad and deep as you

March 26, 2012

Pete Seeger - King Henry (1965)

This man was born in 1919. In his twenties, the 1940s, he was a constant nationwide hit on the radio. In the 1950s, he found success in the group The Weavers and topped the charts for thirteen weeks with Lead Belly’s song “Goodnight, Irene”. In the 1960s, then in his forties, he was a widely popular protest singer. He either wrote or co-wrote the famous songs “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?,” “If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song),” and “Turn! Turn! Turn!”. He was blacklisted during the McCarthy era, popularized “We Shall Overcome” that became the anthem for the American Civil Rights movement, and was largely responsible for bringing attention to Bob Dylan. He’s been the recipient of multiple awards, honors, and recognitions and cannot be fully summarized in this small space.

Currently at the age of ninety-two (and turning ninety-three on May 3rd, 2012), he is still performing and recording songs. Going on right now is a campaign to have Pete become the oldest musician to make it on the music charts with his recent recording of Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young” for the 50th anniversary of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning human rights organization, Amnesty International. If you enjoy his music and would like to learn more, click here. And you can watch a video behind the making of the song, here.

This song below, written and recorded in 1965 by Pete, was released on his 1966 album, Dangerous Songs!?. The album featured songs written by Pete, written by others such as Phil Ochs and Len Chandler, and traditional folk songs passed down from generations.

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Pete Seeger - King Henry (1965)

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Lyrics:

King Henry marched forth, a sword in his hand
Two thousand horsemen all at his command
In a fortnight the rivers ran red through the land
The year, fifteen hundred and twenty

The year it is now nineteen sixty-five
It's easier far to stay half alive
Just keep your mouth shut while the planes zoom and dive
Ten thousand miles over the ocean

Simon was drafted in sixty-three
In sixty-four, sent over the sea
Last month, this letter, he sent to me
He said, "You won't like what I'm sayin’"

He said, "We've no friends here, no hardly a-one
We've got a few generals who just want our guns
But it’ll take more than that if we're ever to win
Why, we'll have to flatten the country"

"It's my own troops I have to watch out for," he said
"I sleep with a pistol right under my head"
He wrote this last month, last week he was dead
And Simon came home in a casket

I mind my own business, I watch my TV
Complain about taxes, but pay anyway
In a civilized manner my forefathers betray
Who long ago struggled for freedom

But each day a new headline screams at my bluff
On TV some general says we must be tough
In my dreams I stare at this family I love
All gutted and spattered with napalm

King Henry marched forth, a sword in his hand
Two thousand horsemen all at his command
In a fortnight the rivers ran red through the land
The year, fifteen hundred and twenty

The year it is now nineteen sixty-five
It's easier far to stay half alive
Just keep your mouth shut while the planes zoom and dive
Ten thousand miles over the ocean

March 23, 2012

The Searchers - What Have They Done to the Rain (1964)

Feeling the success of stardom, bassist Tony Jackson left this group in the summer of 1964 to start his own band, The Vibrations. After releasing hits such as “Sweets for My Sweet,” “Sugar and Spice,” and their most famous song, “Needles and Pins,” things were looking pretty grim for the future of the group. Luckily, they were able to add Frank Allen from Cliff Bennett and The Rebel Rousers as their new bassist and continue their success with hits like "Take Me For What I'm Worth," the song heard below, and "Goodbye My Love".

This song was originally written and performed by the political activist and folk/blues singer, Malvina Reynolds, in 1962. First called “Rain Song,” it was written as a protest about the nuclear testing in the atmosphere that was causing fall-out. For this group, it reached number twenty-nine in the US and number thirteen in the UK. It was later covered, separately, by Marianne Faithfull and Joan Baez.

To read (a little bit) more and hear "Take Me For What I'm Worth," check out our previous post here.



A Special Edition post with Frank Allen of The Searchers!

We've been hitting a lucky streak with these exclusive stories lately. Today's generous contribution comes from Frank Allen of The Searchers who was kind enough to share a tale from '60s music history with A Bit Like You And Me. Enjoy!
A Bit Like You And Me and readers,

One of our most amusing stories was of a concert secretary from a small social club who was very impressed with The Searchers while visiting another venue. This was in the ‘80s, or so, when we had transformed from teen idols into stalwarts of the adult cabaret/concert circuit.

The man rang our guitarist, John McNally, a few days later to enquire about booking us. When he was told the fee, the amount obviously shocked him and he replied that his establishment was a very small club and they could not afford such an amount. John gently explained that it was the price we went out for and there was nothing he could do about it.

After a short pause for thought the man replied, “We don`t actually need the four of you. How much for three?”

To this day I have not forgiven John McNally for asking him which three he wanted!

Frank Allen
Warmest thanks goes out to Frank and The Searchers for sharing this story with us.

To visit The Searchers' website, click here.
To see if they'll be coming to a city near you, check their touring schedule here!

And now that you've enjoyed this exclusive story, why not check out what other exclusive stories we've received?



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The Searchers - What Have They Done to the Rain (1964)

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Lyrics:

Just a little rain
Falling all around
The grass lifts its head
To the heavenly sound
Just a little rain
Just a little rain
What have they done to the rain?

Just a little boy
Standing in the rain
The gentle rain that falls
For years
And the grass is gone
The boy disappears
And rain keeps falling
Like helpless tears
And what have they done to the rain?

Just a little breeze
Out of the sky
The leaves nod their head
As the breeze blows by
Just a little breeze
With some smoke in its eye
What have they done to the rain?

Just a little boy
Standing in the rain
The gentle rain that falls
For years
And the grass is gone
The boy disappears
And rain keeps falling
Like helpless tears
And what have they done to the rain?

What have they done to the rain?

March 22, 2012

Bulldog Breed - Paper Man (1969)

This obscure ‘60s psychedelic rock band only released one album, Made in England, in 1969. Although not the most original piece of work, the entire album is steady enough throughout to keep your ears entertained for its entirety. The genres experienced throughout the album could be categorized from psychedelic and blues to jazz and hard rock. Members of the group were also in equally lesser-known groups of time, including Gun, Please, T2, and Asgard.

This song, the album’s opening track, is my favorite song from the group.

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Bulldog Breed - Paper Man (1969)

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Lyrics:

Get up in the morning; run to the door
It’s what you’ve been waiting for
Read what the headlines have to say
Take a look, see where it’s at today

Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes any way
Paper man comes every day
Bringing the news

Take a seat and a cup of tea
Rest the paper on your knee
See who robbed the house next door
Turn back to the futbol score

Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes any way
Paper man comes every day
Bringing the news

Weekday papers always bring the world into your life
Sunday’s tell of vigors caught with someone else’s wife

Find what fortune has in store
Will you end up rich or poor?
Paper comes in rain and snow
Can’t afford to let it go

Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes any way
Paper man comes every day

Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes every way
Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes every way

Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes any way
Paper man comes every day

Paper man comes every day
Paper man comes any way
Paper man comes every day…

March 21, 2012

Sonny & Cher - Baby Don't Go (1964)

Originally signed with Reprise Records under the name Caesar and Cleo, this couple (Salvatore “Sonny” Bono and Cherilyn “Cher” Sarkisian) had trouble releasing a hit song. In 1964, Sonny decided that they should change their name to Sonny & Cher and they again signed with Reprise Records, who unknowingly signed the pair with whom they already had a contract. The couple soon found the stardom they were seeking by releasing their signature song, “I Got You Babe”. They continued to have success with their songs, and a television variety program, before divorcing in 1975. There’s a lot more history regarding this duo than this small paragraph would have you believe!

Lacking paper to write on, Sonny wrote this song in the middle of the night on a piece of cardboard that came from inside of a shirt. Originally released in September 1964, it was a regional success for the couple. After the success of “I Got You Babe,” Reprise Records re-released the single (in 1965) and it became another big hit.

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Sonny & Cher - Baby Don't Go (1964)

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Lyrics:

(Baby don't go)
(Pretty baby, please don't go)

I never had a mother
I hardly knew my dad
I've been in town for eighteen years
You're the only boy I've had
I can't stay
Maybe I'll be back someday

(Baby don't go)
(Pretty baby, please don't go)
(I love you so)
(Pretty baby, please don't go)

I never had no money
I bought at the second-hand store
The way this old town laughs at me
I just can't take it no more
I can't stay
I'm gonna be a lady someday

(Baby don't go)
(Pretty baby, please don't go)
(I love you so)
(Pretty baby, please don't go)

When I get to the city
My tears will all be dry
My eyes will look so pretty
No one's gonna know I cried
Yes I'm goin' away
Maybe I'll be back someday

(Baby don't go)
Maybe I'll be back someday
(Baby don't go)
Maybe I'll be back someday…

March 20, 2012

Jefferson Airplane - Embryonic Journey (1967)

By the end of the summer in 1966, Jefferson Airplane’s pregnant singer, Signe Toly Anderson, was expecting her first child. Combined with the hostility toward her husband from her bandmates, she wanted out. Luckily for her, when the group was formed, she had a clause inserted into her contract that would allow her to break away from the group for any reason (which she had put in due to her distrust of then manager, Matthew Katz). In late 1966, Anderson parted with the group and what remained of Jefferson Airplane persuaded Grace Slick, of The Great Society, to take her place.

When Slick departed with The Great Society, she took with her two songs: “White Rabbit” and “Somebody to Love,” both of which became enormous hits. Both songs also appeared on the group’s second album, Surrealistic Pillow, which also featured this song. This song was written by the group’s guitarist, Jorma Kaukonen, in 1962 and was added to the album at the insistence of the other members. Though I've never watched the show, you may recognize this song from the last episode of the television show Friends.

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Jefferson Airplane - Embryonic Journey (1967)

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Lyrics:

(instrumental)

March 19, 2012

The McCoys - Runaway (1966)

Created by brothers Randy and Richard Zehringer (later known as Rick Derringer), this group was briefly known as The Rick Z Combo and then Rick and the Raiders before settling on their original and most recognized name. Their best known hit, “Hang On Sloopy,” reached number one in the US and sold over a million copies when Rick was only seventeen years old. Later in life, Rick would play with Johnny Winter, The Edgar Winter Group, Steely Dan, and found solo success with the song “Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo”.

This song came from the group’s 1966 album, You Make Me Feel So Good. The album featured covers of The Beatles, Ritchie Valens, and Buddy Holly. It was also the B-Side to their single featuring the A-side “(You Make Me Feel) So Good”.

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The McCoys - Runaway (1966)

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Lyrics:

(Run, run, run)
(I never should’a run away)

Woke up this mornin’ feelin’ so alone
Said, “What am I doin’ so far away from home?”
Woah-oh-oh
I’ve been gone for just two years
Seems I’ve cried a million tears
Run, run, run
I never should’a run away

Well, real home cookin’ sure beats cold canned beans
And my old job wasn’t half as bad as it seems
Woah-oh-oh
There’s a girl I can’t forget
The more I run, the more I regret
Run, run, run
I never should’a run away
Hey-ey-ey!

Run, run, run
I never should’a run away

I'm goin’ to pack my suitcase and head for the railroad track
If I’m lucky, well, maybe she’ll take me back
Woah-oh-oh
I grew up; I knew I was wrong
I’m comin’ home where I belong
Run, run, run
I never should’a run away
(Run, run)
(I never should’a run away)

Run, run, run
I never should’a run away
(Run, run)
(I never should’a run away)

Run, run, run
I never should’a run away
(Run, run)
(I never should’a run away)

Run, run, run
I never should’a run away…

March 16, 2012

The Left Banke - Pretty Ballerina (1966)

In 1967, this group’s keyboardist and primary songwriter, Michael Brown, began to come at odds with his bandmates. It led to him recording the song, “Ivy, Ivy,” without them, and instead using session musicians. Since he released the song under the band’s name, the other members of the group asked their fan base and radio DJs to not support the record. The single not only flopped, but it prevented the band from major future successes as DJs were reluctant to play the reunited band's material after the previous controversy.

This song, written by Brown, was the follow up to their first hit, “Walk Away Renée,” which was also written by Brown. Luckily, it was recorded and released in late 1966, becoming a hit in early 1967, before all of the internal drama. Both “Walk Away Renée” and this song were written about Renée Fladen, the girlfriend of the group’s bassist, Tom Finn, and the object of Brown’s affection.

To read more about the group and to hear “Walk Away Renée,” check out our previous post here.



A Special Edition post with Tom Finn of The Left Banke!

Today’s post is yet another special edition! The bassist of The Left Banke, Tom Finn, was kind enough to share a great story (at great length!) with A Bit Like You And Me. You'll enjoy this one:
A Bit Like You And Me and readers,

When my band, The Left Banke, first got together back in December of 1965, our rise to success was as rapid as a jet airliner. We did our first recording in February of 1966, "I've Got Something On My Mind," and we immediately played our first show at a church teenage dance in the New York City area. We were paid $100 for this local show, but instead if pocketing the $20 each, we rented a brand new Cadillac limousine, which cost us $75. We all wanted to make the same impact on the young girls as our idols The Beatles had done, so in addition to the limousine, we brought my girlfriend Renée (of "Walk Away Renée" fame) along with us. She was truly a sight to behold with her long Lady Godiva-like bright-blonde hair and black boots up to her knees.

When we arrived, the throngs of young kids were all outside waiting for us. From that moment on, they screamed their heads off until the show was over and we left. What can I say? We were sixteen and seventeen years old at that time.

Our first recording was not accepted by any record company and, so, it was back to the drawing board.

Our next recording was "Walk Away Renée," but it was also turned down by the record companies of the day. Finally Smash/Mercury Records’ A&R man, Charlie Fach, told our producer he liked the big hook and paid an advance of $1,200 for the recording. This was in April of 1966. They released it immediately for the upcoming summer market and we made immediate plans to tour to support "Walk Away Renée".

Our first trip was to Florida, so we went to New York's JFK International Airport to take our first airplane ride ever.

None of us ever flew before, so we were all nervous and telling stories of plane crashes, etc. As we taxied down the runway, I could see our producer/manager waving to us from the roof of the terminal building. The jet, an Eastern Airlines Boeing 707, took off at about an hour before sundown and we gained altitude very quickly. I was feeling better about the flight because everything was smooth and there was no turbulence. We reached our cruising altitude and the “No Smoking” sign went off, so I lit a cigarette and looked out the window.

The pilot came on the intercom and welcomed us aboard, saying, "This is Captain Andrews. We've reached our cruising altitude of 35,000 ft. and over the left wing of the plane you'll see Atlantic Cit-…"

He stopped mid-sentence.

Suddenly all the oxygen masks in the plane dropped down right before my eyes. One of the stewardesses shrieked.

"Oh my God! Grab a mask! Quick!"

I reached for an oxygen mask but the tube was flattened out and no air was coming through. Then I heard a loud roar and we were going down, almost straight down, so fast that the centrifugal force prevented me from lifting my head from the headrest. I looked at the faces of my bandmates and they were all terrified. The passengers were generally quiet except for some whimpering. Anyway, what was happening was a decompression and the pilot was making an emergency descent.

He was trying to get down from 35,000 ft. to about 3,000 ft. in order to neutralize the cabin pressure. He never made an announcement about what was going on at all, so we thought we were going to crash and die. There was no doubt in my mind.

My reaction to the dire situation, which was really very unexpected, was that I got very, very angry. I just kept thinking, "I'm only seventeen and now I'm going to f**king die?" I was really furious at the airline company.

The pilot leveled off at about 5,000 ft. and he finally made an announcement, but he never once said what the problem was. Instead, he said, "Ladies and gentlemen, we're going to return to JFK airport and we might have to circle around until we get a landing assignment."

Well, we eventually landed and went back to the terminal where we waited for another flight. After about two or three hours we boarded another jet. When we were building up takeoff-speed on the runway, this new plane suddenly reversed its engine speed and hit the brakes. The plane skid off the runway and ended up all the way past the end of the runway in the grass. We were bumped around so hard that all of our belongings were all over the place.

Again, we received no explanation for what happened, except one person said they ‘saw a flash of sparks coming from under the plane’. I think something fell off of the plane and hit the concrete and caused the sparks, probably a wing flap.

So then, to evacuate us, they sent a bus out to get us off the field. Anyway, we waited back at the terminal again (until 2:00am) and were finally driven to La Guardia Airport to take another jet. I was so tired from all of this, I actually fell asleep on the third plane, and said to myself, "F**k this, let it crash. I'm going to sleep.”

That plane finally got us to Florida.

This is a true story, with no exaggeration,
Tom Finn
The sincerest thanks to Tom and The Left Banke for this story and their music!

To see if The Left Banke will be in concert near you, click here.
To buy their music, click here, here, and here.
Hear more songs on their Myspace page here.
And check out their website here!

And now that you've enjoyed this exclusive story, why not check out what other exclusive stories we've received?



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The Left Banke - Pretty Ballerina (1966)

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Lyrics:

I had a date with a pretty ballerina
Her hair so brilliant that it hurt my eyes
I asked her for this dance
And then she obliged me
Was I surprised?
Yeah
Was I surprised?
No, not at all

I called her yesterday
It should have been tomorrow
I could not keep
The joy that was inside
I begged for her to tell me
If she really loved me
Somewhere a mountain is moving
Afraid it's moving without me

I had a date with a pretty ballerina
Her hair so brilliant that it hurt my eyes
I asked her for this dance
And then she obliged me
Was I surprised?
Yeah
Was I surprised?
No, not at all

And when I wake on a dreary Sunday morning
I open up my eyes to find there's rain
And something strange within says
"Go ahead and find her
Just close your eyes, yeah
Just close your eyes and she'll be there"
She'll be there
She'll be there

March 15, 2012

Dave Van Ronk - Willie the Weeper (1961)

When Bob Dylan moved to Greenwich Village, New York, at the age of 20, he frequently stayed with this man and his wife. Van Ronk, five years older, taught Dylan guitar techniques as well as exposing him to material that Dylan would use in his later work. Finding his influences in jazz, he became an important figure to the folk scene where he befriended the likes of Dylan, Phil Ochs, Tom Paxton, Joni Mitchell, and many others. He rarely flew, never learned to drive, and never left Greenwich Village for an extended period of time.

Written by Frankie “Half-Pint” Jaxon in 1927, this folk song focuses around drug use. It’s been recorded by Louis Armstrong, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and others, but it is this version by Van Ronk that is said to have inspired The Velvet Underground’s song, “Heroin”.

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Dave Van Ronk - Willie the Weeper (1961)

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Lyrics:

Oh, well a’this is the story about Willie the Weeper
Now, Willie the Weeper was a chimney sweeper
He had the habit, boy, he had it bad
Let me tell ya ‘bout a dream he had

Oh, well he went to the hop house the other night
Wearin’ his goulashes, boy, were shinin’ bright
Ah, well’a called to the boy to bring him some hops
Started then a smokin’ like he’d never stop

Oh, well after he had smoked about a dozen pills
He says, “This ought’a cure all my aches and ills”
Oh, well’a he turned on his side and went to sleep
Dreamed he was a sailor on the ocean deep

Oh, well he played draw poker as they left the land
He won a million dollars on the very first hand
Oh, well he played and he played until the crew went broke
Then he turned around and had another smoke

Oh, well he came to the island of Siam
He rubbed his eyes and said, “I wonder where I am”
He played craps with the King; he won a million more
Had to leave the island ‘cause the King got sore

Oh, well he went to Monte Carlo where he played roulette
He couldn’t lose a penny ‘cause he won every bet
Oh, well he played and he played until the bank went broke
Then he turned around and had another smoke

Oh, well’a then he thought he better be a’sailin’ for home
Oh, well he chartered his ship and sailed away alone
Ah, well the ship hit a rock, he hit the floor
Oh’ho well the dope gave out and the dream was o'er

Oh, well’a that was the story about Willie the Weeper
Now, Willie the Weeper was a yen-pox eater
Someday a pill, too many, he’ll take
And dreamin’ that he’s dead, he will forget to wake

March 14, 2012

We All Together - It's a Sin to Go Away (1972)

Founded by brothers Saul and Manuel Cornejo in 1971, this rock group lived, recorded, and released all of their music from their hometown of Lima, Peru. With songs in both English and Spanish, their accent in English-sung songs is never a concern, if even noticeable. Their songs never managed to make much of an impact in the US or Europe, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t any good. Some of their music, such as the song heard below, could have easily held their own in the US and UK charts had they received more exposure.

This song is the fourth track on their self-titled album released in 1972. The album is solid all the way through and features four cover songs: two tracks from WingsWild Life (1971) and two tracks from Badfinger’s Magic Christian Music (1970). This song, which is easily the best song put out by the group, is an original work that was later released on the second Nuggets compilation.

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We All Together - It's a Sin to Go Away (1972)

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Lyrics:

Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Maybe I'll return
I will

When I turn my head, I saw the lights
That disappeared behind the trees
Then I saw the moon
It was the same
I start to cry hiding my face

Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Maybe I'll return
I will

Then I took the bread
She cooked for me
She said, “My son come back to me
Take my picture and remember this”
Those times are gone
Don't cry for me

Oh it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Maybe I'll return
I will

Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Oh, it's a sin to go away
Maybe I'll return
I will

March 13, 2012

The Box Tops - Soul Deep (1969)

The origins of this group can be traced back to Memphis, Tennessee in 1963 where they were originally known as The Devilles. To prevent confusion with another band of the same name, they switched to their current and well-known name. They reached international stardom with their 1967 number one hit, “The Letter,” (to hear Bob Marley & The Wailers’ version, click here) and continued to release songs of varying success throughout the ‘60s.

Released in June of 1969, this was the last single released by the group that was considered a good success. It was also their last song to get into the Top 40, reaching number three, and came out roughly six and a half months before the group disbanded.

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The Box Tops - Soul Deep (1969)

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Lyrics:

Darling, I don't know much
I know I love you so much
My life depends on your touch

And my love is a river runnin’ soul deep
Way down inside me it’s a’soul deep
It's too big to hide and it can't be denied
Love is a river runnin’ soul deep

I work myself to death for ya
Just to show I adore ya
Nothin’ I wouldn't do for ya

‘cause my love is a river running soul deep
Way down inside me it’s soul deep
It's too big to hide and it can't be denied
Love is a river runnin’ soul deep

All I ever, ever hope to be
Depends on your love for me
Baby, believe me, if you should leave me
I'd be nothin’ but an empty shell
I know darn well, I can tell now

I don't know much
I know I love you so much
My life depends on your touch

And my love is a river runnin’ soul deep
Way down inside me it’s a’soul deep
It's too big to hide and it can't be denied
Love is a river runnin’ soul deep

My love is a river runnin’ soul deep
Way down inside me it’s a’soul deep

My love is a river runnin’ soul deep
Way down inside me it’s a’soul deep

Well my love is a river runnin’ soul deep
Way down inside me it’s a’soul deep…

March 12, 2012

Vera Lynn - We'll Meet Again (1939)

Born in 1917, this English singer, songwriter, and actress was extremely popular during the era of the second world war. During that time, she toured the world giving concerts to the Allied troops and earned herself the nickname “The Forces’ Sweetheart”. After the war, she remained popular as a singer and television actress. Her last public performance was in 1995 at Buckingham Palace, commemorating the 50th anniversary of VE-Day. She’s still alive and will be celebrating her 95th birthday on March 20th, 2012.

Written by Ross Parker and Hugh Charles, this song was made famous by Vera Lynn. To boost the Allied troops morale, the song was sent out to over twenty underground Wartime radio stations owned by the BBC for broadcasting. It has been covered by The Byrds, Johnny Cash, and is referenced in “Vera” on The Wall by Pink Floyd.

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Vera Lynn - We'll Meet Again (1939)

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Lyrics:

We'll meet again
Don't know where
Don't know when
But I know we'll meet again some sunny day

Keep smiling through
Just like you always do
‘til the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away

So will you please say ‘hello’
To the folks that I know
Tell them I won't be long
They'll be happy to know
That as you saw me go
I was singing this song

We'll meet again
Don't know where
Don't know when
But I know we'll meet again some sunny day

We'll meet again
Don't know where
Don't know when
But I know we'll meet again some sunny day

Keep smiling through
Just like you always do
'til the blue skies
Drive the dark clouds far away

So will you please say ‘hello’
To the folks that I know
Tell them I won't be long
They'll be happy to know
That as you saw me go
I was singing this song

We'll meet again
Don't know where
Don't know when
But I know we'll meet again some sunny day

March 09, 2012

The Kinks - Victoria (1969)

Formed in 1962 by brothers still in school, Ray and Dave Davies, this group was initially called the Ray Davies Quartet. Their classmate (and future star), Rod Stewart, was their lead singer for a very brief period of time in early ’62. The group went through more name changes (The Pete Quaife Band, The Bo-Weevils, The Ramrods, and The Ravens) before finally settling on their final name. They went on to release huge hit songs such as “You Really Got Me,” “All Day and All of The Night,” “Lola,” “Waterloo Sunset,” “Supersonic Rocket Ship,” and many, many more.

This song is the opening track on the group’s 1969 concept album, Arthur (or The Decline and Fall of the British Empire). The album told the story of a character named Arthur and his family, who leave London for a new life in Australia. The characters in the album were based on the Davies’ sister, Rose, and her husband, Arthur Anning.

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The Kinks - Victoria (1969)

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Lyrics:

Long ago life was clean
Sex was bad; called obscene
And the rich were so mean
Stately homes for the Lords
Croquet lawns, village greens
Victoria was my queen

Victoria, Victoria
Victoria, Victoria

I was born, lucky me
In a land that I love
Though I’m poor, I am free
When I grow I shall fight
For this land I shall die
Let the sun never set

Victoria, Victoria
Victoria, Victoria

Victoria, Victoria
Victoria, Victoria

Land of hope and glory, uh
Land of my Victoria
Land of hope and glory, uh
Land of my Victoria
Victoria
Victoria

Victoria, Victoria
Victoria, Victoria

Canada to India
Australia to Cornwall
Singapore to Hong Kong
From the West to the East
From the rich to the poor
Victoria loved them all

Victoria, Victoria
Victoria, Victoria

Victoria, Victoria
Victoria

March 08, 2012

Conway Twitty - It's Only Make Believe (1958)

Born Harold Lloyd Jenkins in 1933, this American country musician held the record for most number one singles (in any genre) with fifty-five until it was broken by George Strait in 2006. He started his career with a rockabilly/rock and roll sound in 1958 and transitioned himself into a country star starting in 1965. He frequently won awards for his duets with Loretta Lynn and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame as well as the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

This song was the B-side to a failed release “I’ll Try”. It was written by Twitty and drummer, Jack Nance. Because of the style in which Twitty sang, many people believed that it was Elvis Presley singing the song under a pseudonym. The song reached number one on both the American national charts and the British national charts.

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Conway Twitty - It's Only Make Believe (1958)

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Lyrics:

People see us everywhere
They think you really care
But myself, I can't deceive
I know it's only make believe

My one and only prayer
Is that someday you'll care
My hopes, my dreams come true
My one and only you
No one will ever know
How much I love you so
My only prayer will be
Someday you'll care for me
But it's only make believe

My hopes, my dreams come true
My life I'd give for you
My heart, a wedding ring
My all, my everything
My heart I can't control
You rule my very soul
My only prayer will be
Someday you'll care for me
But it's only make believe

My one and only prayer
Is that someday you'll care
My hopes, my dreams come true
My one and only you
No one will ever know
How much I love you so
My prayers, my hopes, and my schemes
You are my every dream
But it's only make believe

March 07, 2012

Beck, Page, Jones, Moon, & Hopkins – Beck’s Bolero (1966)

Although they never officially became a group, this collection of musicians did manage to get together long enough to record one song together, heard below, in 1966. The “group” was composed of: Jeff Beck of The Yardbirds (and later The Jeff Beck Group); Jimmy Page of The Yardbirds (and later Led Zeppelin); John Paul Jones, a session musician (and later of Led Zeppelin); Keith Moon of The Who; and Nicky Hopkins, a session musician keyboardist who had worked frequently with The Rolling Stones.

Keith Moon arrived to the session wearing a disguise so nobody would know he was playing with somebody other than The Who. John Entwistle, also of The Who, was scheduled to play bass until he had to back out and was replaced by John Paul Jones.

Later released as the B-side to Jeff Beck’s single, “Hi Ho Silver Lining,” this song was originally supposed to be only the beginning of the guys work together. Planning to record a full album, they failed to locate a lead vocalist after being denied by Steve Mariott of The Small Faces. Combined with contractual obligations, the album never happened and this was the only song recorded. The history of this song is quite interesting, and can be read in more detail, on Wikipedia, here.

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Beck, Page, Jones, Moon, & Hopkins – Beck’s Bolero (1966)

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Lyrics:

(instrumental)

March 06, 2012

Tomorrow - Revolution (1967)

First known as Four Plus One and then as The In Crowd before settling on their final name, this group received critical acclaim but never caught much popularity. Along with Pink Floyd, they were one of the first psychedelic bands to come out of England. Their best known song, “My White Bicycle,” has been claimed by the group’s guitarist, Steve Howe, to be England’s first psychedelic song (which I’m sure is up to debate).

This song, released on the group’s 1967 album, Tomorrow, was released a full year before The Beatleshit of the same name. It was likely to also be the inspiration John Lennon used to write The Beatles hit, as his lyrics “you say you want a revolution” supposedly responded to this song’s “have your own little revolution…now!”

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Tomorrow - Revolution (1967)

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Lyrics:

It's not animal, vegetable, or mineral
In Spain, they'd sometimes find them
“Ah,” you might say, “he's beginning”
It changes quickly
But it's a good thing
We have to repeat, “Revolution, revolution…”

Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)

A time will come when we'll be free
When we can talk and meet and see
(Anything)
That's going on
(Everything)
Right or wrong
Free

Flower children spreading love
That's a start
You can tell those with a heart
(Sunrise)
It's so nice
(Open eyes)
See it twice
Free

(Careful walk about, police on your own)
(Careful what you say, police on the phone)

Have your own little revolution
Have your own little revolution
Have your own little revolution now
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)

Happiness is hard to find
We just want peace to blow our minds
(Don't you see)
All the thing?
(Bringing)
Anything you want to bring

(Careful walk about, police on your own)
(Careful what you say, police on the phone)

Have your own little revolution
Have your own little revolution
Have your own little revolution now
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)
Revolution (Now!)

March 02, 2012

The Gants - My Baby Don't Care (1965)

Named after a popular brand of shirt with a button-down collar, this group started up in 1963 playing instrumentals and covering R&B hits. Half of the group was still in high school while the other half was in college when they first found success. At one point in time or another, they played concerts with The Animals, The Dave Clark Five, The Yardbirds, and The Box Tops.

This song, heard below and released in 1965, was the B-side to their Bo Diddley cover, “Road Runner”. It was written by Sid Herring, the group’s lead singer, and borrows its melody from The Beatles’ “Ticket to Ride”.



A Special Edition post with Sid Herring of The Gants!

Today’s post is another amazing special edition! The lead singer, guitarist, and primary songwriter of The Gants, Sid Herring, was kind enough to share a story with A Bit Like You And Me! Here's Sid:
A Bit Like You And Me and readers,

I have a story that not many people know about. When we [The Gants] came to Nashville, Tennessee to finish the Road Runner album in 1965 at The Red Barn Studios, we were on the way back to the hotel after the recording session when, at a stop light, these girls pulled up beside our car, looked over at us, and started screaming.

"There's Herman's Hermits!"

We rolled down the window and they freaked out. As we started talking to them, Vince [Montgomery, bass guitarist] said to me, "They think you’re Peter Noone! Go ahead; let them think that,” to which I replied, “But my English accent isn’t very good!" Vince said to ‘do it anyway and ask them to come up to the room.’ So I did.

We rolled up the window, took off, and they followed us. We were laughing like crazy. I said, "You guys have to help me with this!" Vince agreed.

Shortly after we got up to the room, there was a knock at the door. It was the three girls. I told Vince he'd have to help me out. I opened the door and let them in. I looked at Vince and thought, "Well say something!" Vince wouldn't say a word. So I started talking with my not-so-good English accent and the girls kind of looked at each other. They started asking me questions.

Meanwhile, nobody said a thing but me. After a bit, I almost started to tell them how I wasn’t Peter Noone, but didn't, and continued in my fake English accent. Then, one of them said she had a friend that was over in England that knew Peter Noone and asked me where I lived in England! I didn't know what part of England that Peter Noone was from, so I said “Brickwidge, England,” not knowing if there even was a Brickwidge, England! I just thought it sounded English.

So after not having said a word, the guys finally started laughing. I continued with my accent (which was getting worse) and escorted the girls out the door. After I closed the door, everybody started laughing like crazy and we could hear the girls laughing on the other side.

That was a very funny experience for The Gants. I’ve signed many autographs as Peter Noone before, because no one would ever believe that I wasn’t him. It was the only way I could get them to leave me alone, but it was all in fun!

Thanks for letting us be involved. We appreciate it very much.

-Sid Herring of The Gants

Sid Herring (left) of The Gants and Peter Noone (right) of Herman's Hermits

The Gants had the honor of being the very first post on this site with their song "I Wonder," which you can hear here. A very special 'thank you' to Sid for sharing such a great story!

Don't forget to check out TheGants.com where you can hear samples and purchase Sid's new album, Music For Friends!!

And now that you've enjoyed this exclusive story, why not check out what other exclusive stories we've received?



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The Gants - My Baby Don't Care (1965)

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Lyrics:

I think I should be worried
It doesn’t matter now
But why should I be worried?
She doesn’t love me anyhow

My baby don’t care
My baby don’t care
But I love her anyway

I gave her everything
For riches and gold
I gave her diamond rings
And things that couldn’t be sold

My baby don’t care
My baby don’t care
But I love her anyway

The things she used to do
I could tell she’s not mine
The things she used to say
I could tell she just lied
Just lied

I tried everything I know
But nothing seems to be right
She knows that I love her so
Stayed with her all through the night
Oh, yeah

My baby don’t care
My baby don’t care
But I love her anyway
Anyway
Anyway

March 01, 2012

Clarence "Frogman" Henry - (I Don't Know Why) But I Do (1961)

Born in 1937 in New Orleans, Louisiana, this artist grew up admiring the music and style of Fats Domino and Professor Longhair. His debut song in 1956, “Ain’t Got No Home,” was a big hit for him that would eventually become his signature song. Following more success in the early ‘60s, his popularity led him to opening for The Beatles on eighteen different occasions in 1964. In 1981, he was booked to perform at a private party held by The Rolling Stones aboard a riverboat in his hometown of New Orleans.

This song, written by Paul Gayten and Bobby Charles (credited as Robert Guidry), was Henry’s biggest hit in the US, reaching number four. It was also featured in the movies Forrest Gump (1994) and Mickey Blue Eyes (1999).

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Clarence "Frogman" Henry - (I Don't Know Why) But I Do (1961)

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Lyrics:

I don't know why I love you, but I do
I don't know why I cry so, but I do
I only know I'm lonely and that I want you only
I don't know why I love you, but I do

I can't sleep nights because I feel so restless
I don't know what to do; I feel so helpless
And since you've been away, I cry both night and day
I don't know why I love you, but I do

My days have been so lonely
My nights have been so blue
I don't know how I manage, but I do

Each night I sit alone and tell myself
That I will fall in love with someone else
I guess I'm wastin' time, but I've got to clear my mind
I don't know why I love you, but I do